A Career in Care and Compassion

Staff Perspectives

Sheila Parson is a Direct Support Professional (DSP), her career of nine years.  When asked how she became a DSP she said, “I worked in this field when I was a teenager and decided to get back in the fields. I love to help others in need.” Being a DSP is hard work and there are definitely rough days, like any other job.  To get through tough times Sheila says, “I take time out for myself.  It takes a good team to make the rough edges smooth.  When I hear the people I support tell me that that I’m a …

The Precious Treasure of Imagination

Stories Of People We Support

The Precious Treasure of Imagination James, writer, and Jason, writer and Nazareth College LifePrep member, meet to discuss their passion for creative writing, both being diagnosed with disabilities.  Here is their conversation: Creative Writing Conversation James: We both have a mutually shared interest in the creative arts. I enjoy the literary work of JRR Tolkien and Stephen King. Who motivates you Jason, to pick up a pen and start writing? Jason: Long ago I decided that I was going to write a great book. I was always intent on writing a book in hopes that I could be rich and …

Making An Impact As a Direct Support Professional

Staff Perspectives

Tempest has been a Direct Support Professional at the Arc of Monroe for over a year and shared an inspirational story about a gentleman she worked with, and how this experience helped mold her life and ultimately her career. “I worked with a gentleman for over a year. His most effective way of communicating was by using sign language. I was out sick for almost a week and when I returned he came to me and gave me a hug and verbally said my name. It put the biggest smile on my face and it made me so happy because …

Inclusion in Rochester

Staff Perspectives

Inclusion in Rochester with Barbara Wale, CEO, Arc of Monroe Written by Alison Cundy, Staff at Arc of Monroe I had the good fortune to sit down with Barb Wale and hear her experiences working with people who have intellectual and developmental disabilities.  She also shared her views on inclusion in the Rochester area. Barb began her career forty years ago as a Speech Pathologist and recalls how at that time the community seemed more afraid of people who had disabilities.  Maybe they were uncomfortable with people who were different and weren’t sure how to interact, or what to say.  …